Category: condoms

6 in 10 of America’s Single Guys’ Take Responsibility’ for Contraception

6 in 10 of America’s Single Guys’ Take Responsibility’ for Contraception

From the HealthDay Reporter

About six in 10 sexually active single men in the United States are taking responsibility for birth control, government health officials say.

When they have sex, these unmarried males are using a condom (45 percent), vasectomy, “withdrawal,” or a combination, according to a new report released Thursday from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For the study, the researchers surveyed about 3,700 unmarried and sexually active men, aged 15 to 44.

The researchers found that use of any male birth control method rose from about 52 percent in 2002 to more than 59 percent by 2011-2015.

Male-method contraception was highest (75 percent) among men who had never married, followed by formerly married men (55 percent) and men currently living with their partner (36 percent), said study lead author Kimberly Daniels.

Daniels is a statistician with the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The proportion of guys relying on condoms or vasectomy hasn’t changed since 2002, but use of withdrawal before ejaculation has, Daniels said.

Reliance on pulling out nearly doubled, rising from about 10 percent in 2002 to nearly 19 percent in 2011-2015, the study found.

Asked whether the CDC considers withdrawal a reliable form of contraception, Daniels said it is among the rubric of male methods. Yet as a family-planning tool, the CDC ranks withdrawal relatively poorly, more or less on par with condom use, and far below the effectiveness of the birth control pill for women.

Dr. J. Dennis Fortenberry, chief of adolescent medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, said a “variety of things likely contribute to relatively high levels of [male contraceptive] use.”

Among them, he said, are comprehensive sex education programs, increased emphasis on communication with sexual partners, emphasis on men’s responsibility for contraception, and access to reproductive health services through means such as the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare).

“The data speak against any return to abstinence-only education for younger men, or creation of access barriers to sexual and reproductive health for all people,” Fortenberry added.

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The most Googled questions about contraception answered

The most Googled questions about contraception answered

Contraception is a tricky one.

It shouldn’t be, given that it’s 2017 and the pill was first introduced in 1961 (only to married women, mind you) but despite school sex education, our own experiences and conversations with our mums and friends, plenty of women and girls still feel completely overwhelmed and confused when it comes to contraception.

There are actually 15 different methods of contraception available to women in the UK. A lot of women tend to go on the pill hassle-free but, for others, it’s not always the best option. The pill can cause a range of side effects which may not suit everyone, plus there’s that small major detail of remembering to take it every day. Given its popularity, and the assumption that it is the norm, other methods of contraception which might be more suitable for others can get side-lined. But where are we supposed to start when there are 15 choices?

As we have been raised in the era of technology, more often than not we turn to Google for life advice. And apparently there’s no difference when it comes to sexual health.

We asked Google Trends the top ten questions entered into the search engine when it comes to contraception and, with help from the Family Planning Association – who provide sexual health and contraception advice – we got the answers.

1. What is contraception?

Essentially, methods and devices which stop you from getting pregnant when you have sex. They range from permanent and long-term methods, like the pill, to those which you need to physically use during sex, like condoms.

Some are known in the health service as long-acting reversible contraception (LARCs) and include methods that don’t rely on a person having to remember to take or use them to be effective; like the implant, injection and coil.

2. How does the contraceptive pill work?

How the pill works can be confusing because there are two types of contraceptive pill: The combined pill and the progestogen-only pill.

The combined is the first option doctors usually go for and mainly works by stopping the ovaries from releasing an egg each month aka ovulating. No egg, no baby.

It also thickens the mucus from your cervix, making it more difficult for a sperm to swim through, reach an egg and fertilise it. As another step in mission no pregnancy, the pill makes the lining of the uterus thinner so the uterus is less likely to accept a fertilised egg.

The Progestogen-only pill, also known as the mini pill or POP, varies. All of them thicken the amount of mucus in the cervix and make the lining of the uterus thinner but one group called desogestrel POPs, like Cerazett, also stop the ovary releasing an egg in the same way the combined pill does.

3. Which contraception is best for me?

Everyone is different; what works for your best friend might not work for you. Finding the right contraception may take time and can be a case of trial and error.

Karin O’Sullivan, a sexual health nurse and clinical lead at the FPA, broke down what might and might not work for certain people.

“If you really hate needles, then the injection’s probably not the way to go, and if you’re pretty forgetful then something you have to remember to take every day – like the pill – might not be your safest bet,” she said. “On the other hand, if you have very heavy periods then the combined pill can help reduce them, and if you’ve had difficulty with a variety of hormonal methods then you might want to use the extremely effective IUD, also known as the copper coil.”

There might also be medical reasons which make you less suitable for certain types of contraception so it’s always best to discuss with a doctor.

The FPA have a very handy ‘My Contraception Tool’ on their website which can also provide guidance on the right contraception for you.

4. Is contraception free?

Yep, absolutely. It’s one of the only prescriptions that’s completely free.

5. How effective is the pill?

So you’re taking measures to stop becoming pregnant, but you jussssstttt want to really, really make sure it means no pregnancy.

Both the combined and mini pill are 99 per cent effective BUT that’s as long as they’re taken according to instructions.

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