Category: sexually transmitted disease

Sexually transmitted disease without symptoms? Everything you need to know about it

Sexually transmitted disease without symptoms? Everything you need to know about it

It has no apparent signs until much later in its development

With no outward symptoms in the early stage, chlamydia remains one of the most common sexually transmitted STDs. This is because it is passed on to partners unknowingly through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex. This silent killer can lead to serious or permanent damage to a woman’s reproductive system.

If the infection remains untreated, it can spread to the uterus and fallopian tubes causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can cause permanent damage. This can lead to long-term pelvic paininfertility and ectopic pregnancy which is a life threatening condition.

FACTS ABOUT CHLAMYDIA:

  • SYMPTOMS:Chlamydia is caused by a bacterium called chlamydia trachomatis that is spread through incidental contact, sexually or orally.
  • Affecting both sexes, women can get chlamydia in the cervix, rectum or throat while men can get chlamydia in the urethra (inside the penis), rectum or throat as well.
  • Newborn babies can acquire chlamydia from an infected mother during childbirth and while it may not be common, one can get the infection in the eye through oral or genital contact with the eyes.
  • Those at the highest risk of infection are sexually active young adults especially women under the age of 25, women with multiple partners and gay men.
  • According to healthline.com, infection rates are highest among younger women partly because their immature cervical cells are more vulnerable to infection.
  • One of the most common myths about chlamydia is that it cannot be cured. Not so. Antibiotics can be used to rid the body of this infection.

With no apparent signs until much later in its development, the following symptoms may become noticeable weeks after infection.

Men experience small amounts of clear or cloudy discharge from the tip of the penis, painful urination, burning and itching around the opening of the penis and albeit less common, pain and swelling in one or both testicles.

Women on the other hand experience abnormal vaginal discharge that may have an odor, bleeding between periods, painful periods, abdominal pain with fever, pain when having sex (dyspareunia), itching or burning in or around the vagina and pain when urinating. In some instances, the infection may spread to the fallopian tubes causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The symptoms of PID include fever, severe pelvic pain, nausea and abnormal vaginal bleeding between periods.

When a person is infected in the anus, the main symptoms are discharge, pain and bleeding from that part of the body.

For those who may have contracted chlamydia orally, one may notice a sore throat, cough or fever.

DIAGNOSIS:

Doctors use lab tests to determine whether one is infected or not. They may ask you for a urine sample to check for the presence of the bacteria or a vaginal swab in women, and at times a sample from the urethra in men. If one is suspected to have an infection in the throat, that is swabbed too.

TREATMENT:

Depending on the severity, the doctor will prescribe the recommended dosage of antibiotics which must be followed to the tee and one should refrain from sexual activity to avoid reinfection.

But good news is, the infection should clear up in about a week or so after treatment.

However, women with severe chlamydia may be put on pain medicine and intravenous antibiotics (medicine given through a vein).

Once treatment has commenced it is advisable to be re-tested after three months to be sure the infection is cured.

[…]

The most Googled questions about contraception answered

The most Googled questions about contraception answered

Contraception is a tricky one.

It shouldn’t be, given that it’s 2017 and the pill was first introduced in 1961 (only to married women, mind you) but despite school sex education, our own experiences and conversations with our mums and friends, plenty of women and girls still feel completely overwhelmed and confused when it comes to contraception.

There are actually 15 different methods of contraception available to women in the UK. A lot of women tend to go on the pill hassle-free but, for others, it’s not always the best option. The pill can cause a range of side effects which may not suit everyone, plus there’s that small major detail of remembering to take it every day. Given its popularity, and the assumption that it is the norm, other methods of contraception which might be more suitable for others can get side-lined. But where are we supposed to start when there are 15 choices?

As we have been raised in the era of technology, more often than not we turn to Google for life advice. And apparently there’s no difference when it comes to sexual health.

We asked Google Trends the top ten questions entered into the search engine when it comes to contraception and, with help from the Family Planning Association – who provide sexual health and contraception advice – we got the answers.

1. What is contraception?

Essentially, methods and devices which stop you from getting pregnant when you have sex. They range from permanent and long-term methods, like the pill, to those which you need to physically use during sex, like condoms.

Some are known in the health service as long-acting reversible contraception (LARCs) and include methods that don’t rely on a person having to remember to take or use them to be effective; like the implant, injection and coil.

2. How does the contraceptive pill work?

How the pill works can be confusing because there are two types of contraceptive pill: The combined pill and the progestogen-only pill.

The combined is the first option doctors usually go for and mainly works by stopping the ovaries from releasing an egg each month aka ovulating. No egg, no baby.

It also thickens the mucus from your cervix, making it more difficult for a sperm to swim through, reach an egg and fertilise it. As another step in mission no pregnancy, the pill makes the lining of the uterus thinner so the uterus is less likely to accept a fertilised egg.

The Progestogen-only pill, also known as the mini pill or POP, varies. All of them thicken the amount of mucus in the cervix and make the lining of the uterus thinner but one group called desogestrel POPs, like Cerazett, also stop the ovary releasing an egg in the same way the combined pill does.

3. Which contraception is best for me?

Everyone is different; what works for your best friend might not work for you. Finding the right contraception may take time and can be a case of trial and error.

Karin O’Sullivan, a sexual health nurse and clinical lead at the FPA, broke down what might and might not work for certain people.

“If you really hate needles, then the injection’s probably not the way to go, and if you’re pretty forgetful then something you have to remember to take every day – like the pill – might not be your safest bet,” she said. “On the other hand, if you have very heavy periods then the combined pill can help reduce them, and if you’ve had difficulty with a variety of hormonal methods then you might want to use the extremely effective IUD, also known as the copper coil.”

There might also be medical reasons which make you less suitable for certain types of contraception so it’s always best to discuss with a doctor.

The FPA have a very handy ‘My Contraception Tool’ on their website which can also provide guidance on the right contraception for you.

4. Is contraception free?

Yep, absolutely. It’s one of the only prescriptions that’s completely free.

5. How effective is the pill?

So you’re taking measures to stop becoming pregnant, but you jussssstttt want to really, really make sure it means no pregnancy.

Both the combined and mini pill are 99 per cent effective BUT that’s as long as they’re taken according to instructions.

[…]

This STD is becoming ‘smarter’ and harder to treat

This STD is becoming ‘smarter’ and harder to treat

GENEVA — Gonorrhea is becoming harder and in some cases impossible to treat with antibiotics, the World Health Organization said. “The bacteria that cause gonorrhea are particularly smart. Every time we use a new class of antibiotics to treat the infection, the bacteria evolve to resist them,” said Teodora Wi, a human reproduction specialist at […]

via This STD is becoming ‘smarter’ and harder to treat — myfox8.com

Be A Superhero: Stop Someone From Spreading STDs

Be A Superhero: Stop Someone From Spreading STDs

The content of this article may come off as comical, but this is not a joke. There are assholes (men and women) who don’t get tested or deliberately spread STDs. Yes, it’s every person’s responsibility to ask for a condom or have no sex at all. But what to do when someone swears up and […]

via Be A Superhero: Stop Someone From Spreading STDs — Lyfe Sux Blog

STD: It Could Happen To You

STD: It Could Happen To You

STD: It Could Happen To You Take an appearance at the songs video clips of prominent musicians with intriguing pointers of sex, as well as movies proclaimed to be creatively created and also guided. There is actually absolutely nothing incorrect with sex if it’s done securely and also properly. The threats of getting Sexually Transmitted […]

via STD: It Could Happen To You — osteomedlyon

Sexual Health Information 101: STDs

Sexual Health Information 101: STDs

Working out harmful sex additionally locations you at danger of calling sexually sent out problems in addition to infections. Considering that prophylactics are the had a look at together with particularly preferred contraception technique that secure versus STIs along with venereal diseases, a substantial amount of sex-related wellness and also health and wellness and also […]

via Sexual Health Information 101: STDs — osteomedlyon